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And according to the probe tone experiments, most people also probably recognize that the notes 1, 3, and 5 are also going to be pretty important in the melody. Houston’s song “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” is not in the aforementioned key of C major, but it is in a different major, the key of G♭ major, and this tonal hierarchy works in any key, so let’s use the numbers and look at it the way we’d look at any song on Earth.

There are a number of music libraries that need composers to create music for their clients, and Disc Makers has some helpful tips to get you started. If you upload your music and it’s approved by the library, you can set your own price and earn a percentage of each sale. Music libraries offer some of the most favorable royalty splits in the industry, which isn’t bad for a side hustle.

We went to NAMM, and you should too. It was huge, the traffic was horrible, the parking was tough, but it’s a total game-changer for musicians everywhere.

Mockingbird foundation grants

Let’s look at some examples and how to approach writing with both kinds of bass sounds. And if this article whets your appetite for hip-hop beat production tips, head over to our mentored online course The Art of Hip-Hop Production now and grab a free preview!

For example, in Spotify for Artists, you can see detailed stats for your top 200 songs. You can filter by date range to see whether certain promotional efforts or live shows have correlated with your Spotify activity. You can also track the total streams and listeners of all of your tracks, combined (but note that this “all-time” graph can only go as far back as 2015).

Well, depending on how comfortable you are, inviting guests into your closet where you may or may not have clothes could be a difficult task. Try to find a spot that is softly furnished and quiet. Bars, for example, are not ideal for interviews. You’ll also ideally need a second microphone if the premise of your podcast is interviews. This complicates things slightly and you may have to delve a little deeper into your pockets. Be aware of your acoustic surroundings; it will save you time and money in the long run.

When I produce a track, chorus impact accentuators are always on my mind, especially at the final stage. And while I attempt to challenge myself by trying new methods every now and then, I do have some go-to accentuating techniques that I frequently rely on (and I’m not the only producer who does so). So here are some of the classics.

You’ve just bought a 180-gram audiophile pressing of your favorite album on vinyl. Getting home, you slide it lovingly from the sleeve. As your boutique turntable spins gently, you carefully place the stylus at the record’s edge, settle back on your beanbag with $400 headphones comforting your head, and savor the music just as the artist intended.

Hip hop music grants

Let’s say that you’re mixing a project and it’s arrived to you with phase issues built-in. You have a natural snare recording, but when you turn up the accompanying trigger track, it sounds awful. Usually it’s the above comb-filtering and/or a disturbing lack of low end. You can start by flipping the phase button, and see if that gets you where you need to be. Alternatively, you can zoom in on the waveforms and see what’s up.

Using the guitar fretboard as a template, music theorist Dean Olivet has redesigned harmonic notation in a colorful, intuitive methodology for learning.

This idea has changed my life as a part-time musician (I’m not exaggerating): Do one thing today that will move your career forward, even the least little bit. Don’t think of all the things you want to be doing — all the things that could boost your career. Just think of one of those things. Then do it.

Sometimes the solution is obvious. Maybe the student has a clear goal in mind, and they just don’t know how to get there. Maybe they wanted to make a bumping club track, and the beats are weak — beginner producers usually don’t know how to layer or mix drums. A lot of the time, there are some good ideas but they’re strung together without any particular structure. That’s understandable; structure is hard! Or maybe there was a misguided attempt at “realism.” Every semester, someone takes a piece they composed or arranged and outputs audio straight from their notation software. The result consistently sounds like garbage. I want them to think of the sound coming out of the speakers as the “real” music, not a placeholder for an eventual performance by humans — nothing against live performance, but my class is about making music in the box. Rather than settling for terrible fake strings or brass, we try to figure out what software instruments might sound unapologetically cool.

Start by copying down the kick MIDI, or try playing your bass sound like it’s a kick drum. After all, it should mirror your kick, maybe even exactly. As an example, here’s the bass line from Future’s “First Off.”